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Oral Histories - Houston History Project

Overview

Scope and Contents

Biographical Note

Administrative Information

Finding Aid/Inventory

African American Studies

Arts

Business

Culture

Disaster Response and Recovery

Education

Energy Development

Environmental Issues

Galveston (Tex.) History

Houston (Tex.) History

Immigration

Law

Medicine

Mexican American Studies

Native American Studies

Philanthropy

Politics

Religion

LGBTQ People

Sports

University Of Houston

Women's History



Contact us about this collection

Oral Histories - Houston History Project, 1996- | University of Houston Libraries

By Reddy Guntaka, Tanmay Wagh, Madhuri Keshavarao, Tai Luong

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Collection Overview

Title: Oral Histories - Houston History Project, 1996-View associated digital content.

ID: 07/2006-005

Primary Creator: Houston History Project

Extent: 25.0 Linear Feet

Arrangement:

Oral histories are arranged numerically. Identifers include the Houston History Archives (HHA) number, interviewee's name, and subject module. Interviews consist of typewritten transcripts and audio interviews, presently available for reading and listening in the Special Collections Department of M.D. Anderson Library.

All formats for an interview are shelved by number in appropriate storage boxes.  Transcripts (typed pages) are housed in record cartons, audiotapes and CDs are housed in specialty boxes.  Each format includes sequential numbers appropirate  boxes. Because boxes and formats are configured differently, Box 1 in one format does not hold the same set of interview numbers as Box 1 in another format. However, searching for a specific interview number across formats will  produce all available interivew materials for that interviewee.

Date Acquired: 00/00/2005

Subjects: African-American studies, Arts, Business, Culture, Disaster response and recovery, Emigration and immigration, Energy development, Environmental issues, Medicine, Mexican Americans - Study and teaching, Native American studies, Religion, Sports, Women’s history

Forms of Material: Audiocassettes, Compact discs, Interviews, Sound recordings, Transcripts

Languages: English

Scope and Contents of the Materials

When UH’s Center for Public History and the University Libraries collaborated to create the Houston History Archives (UH-HHA), part of their mission included a repository for oral histories that tell stories of the growth and development of the Gulf Coast region from multiple points of view.  To that end, the Houston Oral History Project in the Center for Public History trains history graduate students to research and interview Houstonians with recollections of the city’s civil rights, women’s, cultural, political, or medical past.  In furtherance of the mission, the UH Oral History Project entered into a collaboration with the City of Houston that will bring to the UH repository interviews of one hundred of Houston’s leaders from all walks of life.  Another large collection headed for the repository is the Offshore Energy Oral History Project, a collaboration among several UH professors and other universities to document  the growth of the oil refining industry along the Gulf Coast before and after World War II.  Topics available include interviews with Katrina emergency responders in Houston, a series of interviews with African American (black) generals, interviews with members of Houston's Indo-Asian population, and interviews from the Afro-American Physicians project, as well as a number of other topics.

Related Materials:

Oral Histories from the Houston History Project digital collection (http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory)

Biographical Note

Joseph Pratt, Ph.D., in the UH Center for Public History, established the Houston History Project to expand and improve the research done on Houston and to serve as a learning laboratory for public history students.  Professor Pratt recognized the appropriateness of a publication supported by both  a research component and a repository for archival collections and oral histories to accomplish these goals.  All three elements – Houston History magazine, the UH Oral History Program, and the Houston History Archives -- reinforce one another and add to our understanding of Houston’s history by recording, reporting, and preserving the narrative of Houston’s past.  Together, the Houston History Project’s three components contribute to the University of Houston’s mission and realize the university’s strategic initiatives.

Subject/Index Terms

African-American studies
Arts
Business
Culture
Disaster response and recovery
Emigration and immigration
Energy development
Environmental issues
Medicine
Mexican Americans - Study and teaching
Native American studies
Religion
Sports
Women’s history

Administrative Information

Repository: University of Houston Libraries

Access Restrictions: Open for research.

Use Restrictions:

Special Collections owns the physical items in our collections, but copyright normally belongs to the creator of the materials or their heirs. The researcher has full responsibility for determining copyright status, locating copyright holders, and abiding by current copyright laws when publishing or displaying copies of Special Collections material in print or electric form. For more information, consult the appropriate librarian.

Photocopy decisions will be made by Special Collection staff on a case-by-case basis. Patrons are responsible for obtaining permission to publish from copyrights holders.

Related Materials: Oral Histories from the Houston History Project digital collection For more information please see http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory.

Preferred Citation: Oral Histories-Houston History Project. Courtesy of Special Collection, University of Houston Libraries.


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: African American Studies],
[Series 2: Arts],
[Series 3: Business],
[Series 4: Culture],
[Series 5: Disaster Response and Recovery],
[Series 6: Education],
[Series 7: Energy Development],
[Series 8: Environmental Issues],
[Series 9: Galveston (Tex.) History],
[Series 10: Houston (Tex.) History],
[Series 11: Immigration],
[Series 12: Law],
[Series 13: Medicine],
[Series 14: Mexican American Studies],
[Series 15: Native American Studies],
[Series 16: Philanthropy],
[Series 17: Politics],
[Series 18: Religion],
[Series 19: LGBTQ People],
[Series 20: Sports],
[Series 21: University Of Houston],
[Series 22: Women's History],
[All]

Series 1: African American Studies
Box 9
Item 547: 00547_Attwell, Ernie [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Dorothee Sauter

Project: University of Houston

During my (Dorothee Sauter) visit Mr. Attwell started to talk easily and introduced me to some major circumstances in his life. I told him my interest in interviewing him is to get some insights about daily life for individuals and for different organizations in the Third Ward before and after desegregation. I also brought up some information about my life.

At the day of the interview, November 12, 2004, six kittens were waiting in the front of his two story family home, built in the sixties. Mr. Attwell had been to the doctor earlier in the morning. He has diabetes, an acute problem with his leg and very short eye sight. To warm his sitting area inside, where the coffee table and a part of the sofa was overloaded in a lose way with newspapers, cutout articles, brochures and planning documents., Ernie Attwell had a little electric heater running.

Mr. Attwell with a great sense of humor and in a warm hearted way welcomed me in two languages. He started the interview in a very organized way and precisely remembered my area of interest which I had outlined on my introductory visit. During the interview he was willing to talk, he also allowed laughter and side stories. Toward the end of the interview Ernie Attwell changed to a slower pace and his concentration became a little loose.

Ernie Attwell left me two news paper articles and two plans of the City of Houston, Department of Planning and Development, looking at the Third Ward. He also let me copy two photos, one portraying his mother, the second a portrait of himself.

Item 550: 00550_Dickey, Velma_Louisiana(2004) [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Gertrudis Cabrera

Project: University of Houston

Velma Dickey was born in Shereveport, Louisiana in 1948. She migrated to Houston after finishing high school. She graduated third of her class. Velma's mother died two weeks before the end of the school year. Velma moved to Houston to live with her half sister and her husband. She attended college in Grambling, Louisiana, a college for African Americans. Sometimes during the summer and school holidays she will come to Houston, but preferred to stay in Louisiana. After graduating from college in 1970, she came back to live in Houston permanently.

Velma remembers seating on the back of the bus, and going to demonstrations during the Civil Rights Movement. I want her to share her personal experiences of the Civil Rights Movement and her feelings and insights about moving from an African American community in Louisiana to a racely mix community in Houston

Item 551: 00551_Foreman Doris_Houston(2004) [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Gertrudis Cabrera

Project: University of Houston

Doris Foreman migrated to Houston in 1965. She was born in Bryan, Texas. At the age of 16 Doris decided to leave home and moved to Houston. Her sister was working as a nurse in 'The Big City'. Doris had no working skills and did not finish high school. I want to learn about her reasons for migrating to Houston. How was life for an African American teenager in a small town, and how her life changed in her new setting? Were her experiences with segregation in a small town different from the big city? What kind of jobs and other opportunities were open to her in Houston in 1965.

Item 557: 00557_Lawson, William Rev. [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Dorothee Sauter

Project: University of Houston

Box 10
Item 623: 00623_Burney, Zinetta_Law Firm 1976 [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 624: 00624_Davis, Algenita_Law Firm 1976 [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 625: 00625_Edwards, Joan_Law Firm 1976 [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 626: 00626_Hartsfield, Haroldeen_Law Firm 1976 [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 627: 00627_Locke, Gene_UH Student Activism [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 628: 00628_Williams, Beneva_School Desegregation [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 629: 00629_Bacon, Robert_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 630: 00630_Bailey, Rahn_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 631: 00631_Banfield, Edison_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 632: 00632_Banfield, Michael_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 633: 00633_Bransford, Paris_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 634: 00634_Carrol, Natalie_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 635: 00635_Clemmons, John_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 636: 00636_Colman, June_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 637: 00637_Harris, Bernard_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 638: 00638_Hunter, Jr., Oliver_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 639: 00639_Hunter, III, Oliver_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 640: 00640_Jones, Edith_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Box 11
Item 641: 00641_Kendall, Kevin_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 642: 00642_Perry, Eula_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 643: 00643_Perry, Levi_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 644: 00644_Weaver, Seymore_African-American Physicians [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 656: 00656_Briggs, Ronald_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 657: 00657_Becton, Julius_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 658: 00658_Berry, James_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 659: 00659_Brailsford, Martin_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 660: 00660_Cheatham, James_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 661: 00661_Gaskil, Robert_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 662: 00662_Greer, Edward_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 663: 00663_Gregg, Arthur_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 664: 00664_Jackson, Frank_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 665: 00665_Kelley, Danny_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 666: 00666_Leassear, Leonard_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 667: 00667_McLeod, John S_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 668: 00668_Matthews, Paul_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 669: 00669_Miller, Clarence_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 670: 00670_Parker, Julius_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 671: 00671_Thomas, A.I._Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 672: 00672_Williams, James_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 673: 00673_Woods, Sanderson_Black Officers [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Box 13
Item 745: 00745_Anderson, Robert L._Ryan Middle School[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s):  Debbie Harwell

Project: University of Houston

Judge Anderson graduated from Yates High School in 1958. Coming from one of Texas’ early founding families in Sealy, he also offers the unique perspective of someone who attended high in both the integrated North and the segregated South. He discusses the difference in education between the two, and the impact that Yates teachers will able to have as an integral part of the community. He details college, Air Force and law school experiences. Judge Anderson started the first black law firm in Houston and served as a municipal judge In Houston.

Item 746: 00746_Dickson,Donald_Ryan Middle School[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s):  Debbie Harwell

Project: University of Houston

Rev. Dickson graduated from Yates High School in 1958. He was born and raised in the Third Ward and discusses his experiences growing up in the area and the role Yates and its teachers and principal played in the community. He offers a description of how the decline in community spirit and cohesiveness that occurred with the opening of the new Yates High School building and the removal of the principal in favor of one from the school's Fifth Ward rival. He details his post-graduate experiences at Texas Southern University, and his career in education as a coach and administrator, offering valuable comparisons across the fifty-year period.

Item 747: 00747_Elliot, Tricia_African American Physicians[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s):  Lauran-Kerr Heraly

Project: University of Houston

Dr. Tricia Elliott was born in Jamaica and moved to the United States when she was eight.  Following high school, she went to medical school at UTMB in Galveston where she decided to go into family medicine.  Dr. Elliott did her residency and internship at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx and following her three years stayed on as a physician and faculty member.  She moved back to Houston in 2002, and at the time of the interview served as the program director for the residency program at the Baylor College of Medicine/Kelsey-Seybold Clinic.  Throughout the interview, Dr. Elliott talks about her career path, experiences as an African American woman in medicine, and organizations that she is involved in.

Item 748: 00748_Green, Beatrice_Ryan Middle School[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Reed Amadon

Project: University of Houston

Beatrice Green was able to give a context to the Yates High School experience; Beatrice is a reflection of the strong Black Third Ward community that developed as a result of segregation and isolation. Her work as a Governess of the James Baker home shows the employment opportunities available at the time and her ability to deal with the role and to thrive in the position. Her involvement in the integration of the Texas Lutheran Church and her work as a Union Volunteer worker also portrays the role women played in the unfolding Civil rights struggle.

Item 749: 00749_Gurnell_Kathy Scott_African American Physicians[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s):  Lauran-Kerr Heraly

Project: University of Houston

Dr. Kathy Scott-Gurnell was born in Houston, went to college at UT in Austin, then followed with medical school at UTMB in Galveston.  She did her residency and pediatrics internship at UT Medical School in Houston, and eventually shifted disciplines to work as a child psychiatrist.  She talks about African Americans working twice as hard both in school and in their professional lives.  Dr. Scott-Gurnell also discusses her experiences as an African American physician, and contributions she made to the medical field.

Item 750: 00750_Holland, William & Holland, Edith Nealy_Ryan Middle School[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Anna Burke

Project: University of Houston

Bill and Edith Holland are the children of former Yates High School principal William Holland, an activist in the Houston Educational Civil Rights Movement. His activism pushed for the equality of white and black HISD schools in the face of heavy opposition and segregation. Bill and Edith talk about their father’s formative years in Indiana, about segregation in Houston and their father’s activism at Yates High School.

Item 751: 00751_Johnson, Deloris_ Ryan Middle School[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Reed Amadon

Project: University of Houston

Deloris offered an insight into the class of 1958 at Yates High School. She was a student who lived through the civil rights activities and was propelled into involvement when she went off to college. Her life as an active student in a strong spirited school was contrasted with her inability to sit in a downtown restaurant or ride a bus outside the “colored” seats. She was a happy, intelligent student who lived in fear that the movement for equality would turn violent, sparking race riots like in other cities in the South. Her story exemplifies a fierce rejection of the status whites gave blacks. As her high school principle, William Holland, said, “You have got to be prepared. You can’t just be as good as the whites, you have to be better.”

She spent her life demonstrating her equality as an African American.

Item 752: 00752_Johnson, Deloris & Johnson, Napolean_Ryan Middle School[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Debbie Harwell

Project: University of Houston

Deloris Johnson and Napoleon Johnson were classmates at Yates High School.  This interview was intended to be a preliminary meeting with several members of the Class of 1958.  Deloris and Napoleon discuss some of their experiences as students at Yates.  Some parts of the interview include a discussion of future interview logistics such as what themes should be discussed, and identifying others from the class of 1958 that should be interviewed.   Napoleon Johnson does go into some detail about his professional life, including his work at NASA and as an anchorman at channel 2.  Deloris Johnson was interviewed again separately for this project.

Item 753: 00753_Smith, Latisha_African American Physicians[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s):  Lauran-Kerr Heraly

Project: University of Houston

Dr. Latisha Smith was born in Detroit, MI, attended Michigan State for undergrad then Hahnemann University in Philadelphia for medical school.  She returned to Michigan for her residency and training where she specialized in internal medicine.  Dr. Smith discusses her influences in going into the medical field.  She focused her early career on public health service, moving to different communities in need throughout the United States.  She moved to Houston in 1997, where she was hired by the University of Texas Medical School as an assistant professor and working with patients in the hyperbaric chamber.  Dr. Smith also talks about her experiences as an African American physician, obstacles that she had to overcome, and positive changes for African Americans in the field of medicine.

Box 14
Item 775: 00775_Allen, Omowale Luthuli_Civil Rights Movement[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Ezell Wilson

Project: University of Houston

Omawale Lithuli Allen  is a social worker case manager in Houston, Texas who works with human rights cases. He first came to Houston in 1966, to attend the University of Houston. In this interview, Allen notes the impact of the Civil Rights movement and student activism on his life as a student at the university. He discusses the various events and people who shaped his life during the racially polarized environment of the late 1960s, including Dr. Martin Luther King, efforts towards integration, and student activism groups both at the University of Houston and alliances with other groups such as at Texas Southern University. A sense of social unrest and dissent is present through his personal accounts on the TSU riot, but his narrative is focused on the importance of community building efforts within the Third Ward during this era.

Item 776: 00776_Barnes, Michelle_Civil Rights Movement[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Ezell Wilson

Project: University of Houston

Michelle Anita Swain Barnes discusses in this interview her activism while a student at the University of Houston, and major events that occurred in the civil rights movement during her tenure.  She also outlines her community work in the Third Ward.

Item 777: 00777_Carrington, Ray_Civil Rights Movement[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Ezell Wilson

Project: University of Houston

This interview with Ray Douglas Carrington, III, a photography instructor at Jack Yates High School, both recalls the struggle for Civil Rights in Houston during the 1960s and calls for continued awareness of community building to combat issues facing African-American communities such as in Houston’s Third Ward. Carrington uses his personal experiences in Houston, as a student on a Tennis scholarship at Texas Southern University during the 1960s to illustrate a diverse range of issues such as institutional racism (through the TSU riots), the importance of family and community building (his experiences at Jack Yates), and the importance of financial and personal responsibility – pulling oneself up by the bootstraps(much of his focus in the last half of the interview).

Item 778: 00778_King, Ester_Civil Rights Movement[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Ezell Wilson

Project: University of Houston

Item 779: 00779_Lee, Elwyn_Civil Rights Movement[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Ezell Wilson & Natalie Garza

Project: University of Houston

This interview with Elwyn Lee, the current Vice President for Community Relations and Institutional Access (as of Fall 2013),  recounts his roots and subsequent return to the city of Houston, especially focused on his involvement with the birth of the African American Studies program at the University of Houston.  Lee, who first came to Houston less than a year after his birth in 1949, recalls growing up in the Third Ward during the increasingly racially polarized ‘50s and ‘60s. His experiences at Yale during the Civil Rights era (such as seeing the rise of an African American studies program, and being influenced by the Voting Rights Act) would inspire him to return to his hometown, where he was instrumental in getting the African American Studies program off the ground as one of its first directors.

Item 780: 00780_MacGregor Park Junior Tennis Program-Alumni[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Steph McDougal

Project: University of Houston

This is a group interview with John Wilkerson, George Kennard, Jermayn Mack, Larry Thomas, Meg Toups, Patrick Jefferson, Rachelle Mack, Darvita Mack Powe, Leon Belcher and Michon Benson.

This group interview with the alumni of the MacGregor Park Junior Tennis Program, including noted coach John Wilkerson, focuses upon the effects of the program in motivating and driving its members for their various successes in life. Topics include the importance and rewards of dedication, the shared sense of community and family built by the group, the accomplishments of Coach Wilkerson and two of his most successful protégés (Zina Garrison and Lori McNeil), as well as some of the challenges and adversities faced in the program.

Item 781: 00781_Hunt, Priscilla[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Debbie Harwell

Project: University of Houston

Item 782: 00782_Stedman, Susan Goodwillie[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Debbie Harwell

Project: University of Houston

Item 783: 00783_Zetzel, Geraldine[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Debbie Harwell

Project: University of Houston

Item 784: 00784_Wednesdays in Mississippi (Group)[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Debbie Harwell

Project: University of Houston

This is a group interview with Priscilla Hunt, Susan Goodwillie Stedman and Geraldiine Zetzel.

Item 791: 00791_Allen, Pamela Braziel_Religion[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Travis Braziel

Project: University of Houston

Pamela Braziel Allen, daughter of Overseer Ruby Lee Braziel, talks with her son, Travis, about the life and ministry of Overseer Braziel, founder of the Third Ward’s The Lord Jesus Christ Holiness Church. Braziel grew up in East Texas and moved with her husband to Houston for employment opportunities. When called by God, she started her own congregation and built two church structures, the second one without any bank financing. Allen recalls the highs and lows of Overseer’s ministry, including the obstacles she faced as a woman pastor, the growth of her congregation, and the miracles she performed. Allen also discusses the current life of the church and the involvement of many members of the Braziel family and her hopes for the future.

Item 806: 00806_Holder, Angela_Camp Logan[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Emma Brown

Project: University Of Houston

Houston Community College history professor Angela Holder discusses the Camp Logan Riot of 1917. She discusses the location of Camp Logan, and describes how the all-African American Third Battalion of the Twenty-fourth Infantry Regiment was stationed there, after serving diligently in Mexico. Holder discusses the events that preceded the riot, including an incident involving two white police officers and a black woman in a state of undress. She then discusses the theory that the men were trying to defend themselves, and discusses various forms of disrespect the men faced including verbal abuse and loss of side arms. Holder then discusses how the trial of the sixty-three men lead to a smoother transition to integration in Houston during the Civil Rights Movement. She speaks of her great-uncle Jesse Moore, who was hung for involvement in the riot, and discusses the need to prevent such a loss of life, especially after such a quick murder trial. Holder discusses reforms in the military’s system for trying murder cases, and further discusses some of the more questionable deaths that occurred during or after the riot including Bryan Watson, due to friendly fire, and Vida Henry. Holder notes that no white officers were tried, and the mysterious death of Captain Bartlett James. She also discusses how Captain Haig Shekerjiaf changes from defense to the prosecution after the death of Captain James. Holder discusses the unmarked graves Vida Henry and Bryan Watson at the College Memorial Park Cemetery, how the military appears to have dumped these men, and her efforts with the College Memorial Park Cemetery Restoration Project.

Item 809: 00809_Leland, Alison_Mickey Leland[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Jacob Wagner

Project: University Of Houston

Dr. Alison Leland, a political science professor at the University of Houston talks about her husband, former Houston Congressman Mickey Leland. Dr. Leland married Mickey Leland in 1983, while she was obtaining her law degree at Georgetown University, and he was just starting his third term as a congressman. Mickey Leland represented the 18th District of Texas in the House of Representatives, which encompassed the Fifth Ward, Third Ward of Houston, as well as areas near Rice University and Houston Heights. Prior to his time in the House of Representatives, Mickey served as a representative in the Texas House. During his political career, Mickey was characterized by a humanitarian attitude, and helping those in need of a voice. From his own humble beginnings, Congressman Leland established a precedent of assisting those most in need to give them the opportunities he did not have. Mickey Leland was killed in a plane crash in Ethiopia while on a humanitarian mission. Alison Leland candidly discusses that period of time as a wife and mother. The couple had a very young child and she had just found out she was expecting twins. Despite his loss twenty-five years ago, Alison Leland marvels at how he remains alive in the memories of those who knew him and how she continues to learn things about her husband every day.

Item 823: 00823_Lee, Robert E III_Politics[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Aaron Goffney

Project: University of Houston

Robert E. Lee III begins with The Art of War by Sun Tzu and mentions how all major generals have read it. Lee then talks about the Panther Party and his ancestry. He discusses the origin behind his name, and the relation to the Civil War general Robert E. Lee. On the topic of the Black Heritage Gallery, Lee mentions the importance of the black historian. He talks on the Black Panther Party, its history and also the story of his parents. After discussing his mother and father, Lee discusses the black underworld. Citing the term “invisible social construct,” Lee tells of the strong black community that was fostered. Lee tells of his schooling experiences, mentioning Southern University and his youthful times with Mickey Leland at Afton Elementary School. He talks about introducing politics to Leland, his brother El Franco Lee, and friend Carl Hampton, and reminisces about their political activism and the coalitions, which were formed including the People’s Party II. The interview discusses Carl getting killed by the Houston Police Department. Lee returns to the topics of the Black Panther Party his family. After talking about his siblings, Lee discusses his first job, the experience of his mother firing him, and travelling with his father. Lee talks about starting the Houston Texas Trail Blazers Association and C. F. Smith organizing a Tuskegee training school for black pilots. Lee also mentions Janet Pomeroy and her pioneer work for persons with disabilities who play sports. Lee refers to the Greek warrior Achilles, referencing to it to explain his own birth with an Achilles’ mark and what that sign stands for to him as a warrior.


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: African American Studies],
[Series 2: Arts],
[Series 3: Business],
[Series 4: Culture],
[Series 5: Disaster Response and Recovery],
[Series 6: Education],
[Series 7: Energy Development],
[Series 8: Environmental Issues],
[Series 9: Galveston (Tex.) History],
[Series 10: Houston (Tex.) History],
[Series 11: Immigration],
[Series 12: Law],
[Series 13: Medicine],
[Series 14: Mexican American Studies],
[Series 15: Native American Studies],
[Series 16: Philanthropy],
[Series 17: Politics],
[Series 18: Religion],
[Series 19: LGBTQ People],
[Series 20: Sports],
[Series 21: University Of Houston],
[Series 22: Women's History],
[All]

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