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Oral Histories - Houston History Project

Overview

Scope and Contents

Biographical Note

Administrative Information

Finding Aid/Inventory

African American Studies

Arts

Business

Culture

Disaster Response and Recovery

Education

Energy Development

Environmental Issues

Galveston (Tex.) History

Houston (Tex.) History

Immigration

Law

Medicine

Mexican American Studies

Native American Studies

Philanthropy

Politics

Religion

LGBTQ People

Sports

University Of Houston

Women's History



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Oral Histories - Houston History Project, 1996- | University of Houston Libraries

By Reddy Guntaka, Tanmay Wagh, Madhuri Keshavarao, Tai Luong

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Collection Overview

Title: Oral Histories - Houston History Project, 1996-View associated digital content.

ID: 07/2006-005

Primary Creator: Houston History Project

Extent: 25.0 Linear Feet

Arrangement:

Oral histories are arranged numerically. Identifers include the Houston History Archives (HHA) number, interviewee's name, and subject module. Interviews consist of typewritten transcripts and audio interviews, presently available for reading and listening in the Special Collections Department of M.D. Anderson Library.

All formats for an interview are shelved by number in appropriate storage boxes.  Transcripts (typed pages) are housed in record cartons, audiotapes and CDs are housed in specialty boxes.  Each format includes sequential numbers appropirate  boxes. Because boxes and formats are configured differently, Box 1 in one format does not hold the same set of interview numbers as Box 1 in another format. However, searching for a specific interview number across formats will  produce all available interivew materials for that interviewee.

Date Acquired: 00/00/2005

Subjects: African-American studies, Arts, Business, Culture, Disaster response and recovery, Emigration and immigration, Energy development, Environmental issues, Medicine, Mexican Americans - Study and teaching, Native American studies, Religion, Sports, Women’s history

Forms of Material: Audiocassettes, Compact discs, Interviews, Sound recordings, Transcripts

Languages: English

Scope and Contents of the Materials

When UH’s Center for Public History and the University Libraries collaborated to create the Houston History Archives (UH-HHA), part of their mission included a repository for oral histories that tell stories of the growth and development of the Gulf Coast region from multiple points of view.  To that end, the Houston Oral History Project in the Center for Public History trains history graduate students to research and interview Houstonians with recollections of the city’s civil rights, women’s, cultural, political, or medical past.  In furtherance of the mission, the UH Oral History Project entered into a collaboration with the City of Houston that will bring to the UH repository interviews of one hundred of Houston’s leaders from all walks of life.  Another large collection headed for the repository is the Offshore Energy Oral History Project, a collaboration among several UH professors and other universities to document  the growth of the oil refining industry along the Gulf Coast before and after World War II.  Topics available include interviews with Katrina emergency responders in Houston, a series of interviews with African American (black) generals, interviews with members of Houston's Indo-Asian population, and interviews from the Afro-American Physicians project, as well as a number of other topics.

Related Materials:

Oral Histories from the Houston History Project digital collection (http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory)

Biographical Note

Joseph Pratt, Ph.D., in the UH Center for Public History, established the Houston History Project to expand and improve the research done on Houston and to serve as a learning laboratory for public history students.  Professor Pratt recognized the appropriateness of a publication supported by both  a research component and a repository for archival collections and oral histories to accomplish these goals.  All three elements – Houston History magazine, the UH Oral History Program, and the Houston History Archives -- reinforce one another and add to our understanding of Houston’s history by recording, reporting, and preserving the narrative of Houston’s past.  Together, the Houston History Project’s three components contribute to the University of Houston’s mission and realize the university’s strategic initiatives.

Subject/Index Terms

African-American studies
Arts
Business
Culture
Disaster response and recovery
Emigration and immigration
Energy development
Environmental issues
Medicine
Mexican Americans - Study and teaching
Native American studies
Religion
Sports
Women’s history

Administrative Information

Repository: University of Houston Libraries

Access Restrictions: Open for research.

Use Restrictions:

Special Collections owns the physical items in our collections, but copyright normally belongs to the creator of the materials or their heirs. The researcher has full responsibility for determining copyright status, locating copyright holders, and abiding by current copyright laws when publishing or displaying copies of Special Collections material in print or electric form. For more information, consult the appropriate librarian.

Photocopy decisions will be made by Special Collection staff on a case-by-case basis. Patrons are responsible for obtaining permission to publish from copyrights holders.

Related Materials: Oral Histories from the Houston History Project digital collection For more information please see http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory.

Preferred Citation: Oral Histories-Houston History Project. Courtesy of Special Collection, University of Houston Libraries.


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: African American Studies],
[Series 2: Arts],
[Series 3: Business],
[Series 4: Culture],
[Series 5: Disaster Response and Recovery],
[Series 6: Education],
[Series 7: Energy Development],
[Series 8: Environmental Issues],
[Series 9: Galveston (Tex.) History],
[Series 10: Houston (Tex.) History],
[Series 11: Immigration],
[Series 12: Law],
[Series 13: Medicine],
[Series 14: Mexican American Studies],
[Series 15: Native American Studies],
[Series 16: Philanthropy],
[Series 17: Politics],
[Series 18: Religion],
[Series 19: LGBTQ People],
[Series 20: Sports],
[Series 21: University Of Houston],
[Series 22: Women's History],
[All]

Series 22: Women's History
Box 13
Item 729: 00729_Anderson, Pokey [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 730: 00730_Pennington, Erin [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Erin Pennington spent a tour of duty with the United States Coast Guard that included a circumnavigation of the earth. She lends insights to the work of the Coast Guard and the role of women in that branch of service from boot camp to daily life aboard ship and arriving ports of call.
Box 14
Item 797: 00797_Chevalier, Keli_Military Service[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Debbie Harwell

Project: University Of Houston

Major Keli Chevalier, the founder of the nonprofit Trauma to Triumph, discusses how she came to join the military to pay for her education and describes, her almost twenty-year career that included a tour in Kosovo and two in Iraq. She began her military career demonstrating biomedical equipment and later moved into logistics, responsible for getting U.S. Army service men and women and supplies in and out of the world‘s trouble spots. She describes coming under fire the moment her plane touched down in Iraq in 2003, being raped by a non-commissioned officer just days later, how that incident impacted her personally, and the Green to gold scholarship that enabled her to finish her degree at the University of Houston. In 2009, she was called up to return to Iraq and she describes how the Army and the war had changed since her first tour, including the shift from IEDs to suicide bombers to attack U.S. troops. After being injured, she had long-needed back surgery and retired from the military. Upon her return to Houston, Chevalier felt it was critical to address the incidence of PTSD seen in returning troops. While acknowledging the VA tries to address the problem, it lacks the resources, necessitating the private sector to step in. She formed the nonprofit Trauma to Triumph to help women getting out the military transition to civilian life, assisting with a place to live, clothes, food, their children‘s needs, whatever it takes to get them back on their feet.

Item 805: 00805_Hill, Shea[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Lindsay Scovil

Project: University Of Houston

Shea Hill discusses the current and future goals and happenings of the Heights Woman’s Club in Houston, Texas. A brief amount of history of the club is discussed including the donation of the clubhouse land by Mrs. Cooley, the club flower, and the club motto, but the interview mostly consists of details surrounding current membership policies and current events such as the Witches’ Luncheon, the Hortense Ward Award, and community donations. Hill talks about the two current groups within the club, the Heritage Group and the Evening Group.

Item 816: 00816_Rudy, Beverly_Law[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Debbie Harwell

Project: University of Houston

Beverly Rudy discusses her early years growing up in Oklahoma and Arkansas. She left high school at the end of her junior year to attend the University of Texas. She married Ellis Rudy and moved to Houston where she completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Houston. Her husband contracted hepatitis causing Beverly to feel she needed a career and decided on law school. She discusses her experiences in law school, and her delay getting into the fail after failing the bar exam the first time. After taking an interest in helping non-profits, she decided to take the exam again and passed. Rudy details the challenges women faced in law school, her involvement in Kappa Beta Pi women’s legal sorority, discrimination such as having to sit outside the door of the bar association meetings held at the Houston Club because women were not allowed inside. She explains how certain fields of law were closed to women by the good-old-boy network; as a result she gave her criminal cases, for example, to Richard “Racehorse” Haynes. She discusses field that have emerged or expanded since she attended law school including juvenile law, oil and gas law, and arbitration. Two areas that she fought for women’s rights included marital property rights and representation on juries, pointing out the irony of being able to practice law in a courtroom where she would have been ineligible to sit on the jury because of her sex. Rudy also discusses the importance of women attorneys today continuing to mentor young women coming up in the field.


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: African American Studies],
[Series 2: Arts],
[Series 3: Business],
[Series 4: Culture],
[Series 5: Disaster Response and Recovery],
[Series 6: Education],
[Series 7: Energy Development],
[Series 8: Environmental Issues],
[Series 9: Galveston (Tex.) History],
[Series 10: Houston (Tex.) History],
[Series 11: Immigration],
[Series 12: Law],
[Series 13: Medicine],
[Series 14: Mexican American Studies],
[Series 15: Native American Studies],
[Series 16: Philanthropy],
[Series 17: Politics],
[Series 18: Religion],
[Series 19: LGBTQ People],
[Series 20: Sports],
[Series 21: University Of Houston],
[Series 22: Women's History],
[All]

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