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Oral Histories - Houston History Project

Overview

Scope and Contents

Biographical Note

Administrative Information

Finding Aid/Inventory

African American Studies

Arts

Business

Culture

Disaster Response and Recovery

Education

Energy Development

Environmental Issues

Galveston (Tex.) History

Houston (Tex.) History

Immigration

Law

Medicine

Mexican American Studies

Native American Studies

Philanthropy

Politics

Religion

LGBTQ People

Sports

University Of Houston

Women's History



Contact us about this collection

Oral Histories - Houston History Project, 1996- | University of Houston Libraries

By Reddy Guntaka, Tanmay Wagh, Madhuri Keshavarao, Tai Luong

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Collection Overview

Title: Oral Histories - Houston History Project, 1996-View associated digital content.

ID: 07/2006-005

Primary Creator: Houston History Project

Extent: 25.0 Linear Feet

Arrangement:

Oral histories are arranged numerically. Identifers include the Houston History Archives (HHA) number, interviewee's name, and subject module. Interviews consist of typewritten transcripts and audio interviews, presently available for reading and listening in the Special Collections Department of M.D. Anderson Library.

All formats for an interview are shelved by number in appropriate storage boxes.  Transcripts (typed pages) are housed in record cartons, audiotapes and CDs are housed in specialty boxes.  Each format includes sequential numbers appropirate  boxes. Because boxes and formats are configured differently, Box 1 in one format does not hold the same set of interview numbers as Box 1 in another format. However, searching for a specific interview number across formats will  produce all available interivew materials for that interviewee.

Date Acquired: 00/00/2005

Subjects: African-American studies, Arts, Business, Culture, Disaster response and recovery, Emigration and immigration, Energy development, Environmental issues, Medicine, Mexican Americans - Study and teaching, Native American studies, Religion, Sports, Women’s history

Forms of Material: Audiocassettes, Compact discs, Interviews, Sound recordings, Transcripts

Languages: English

Scope and Contents of the Materials

When UH’s Center for Public History and the University Libraries collaborated to create the Houston History Archives (UH-HHA), part of their mission included a repository for oral histories that tell stories of the growth and development of the Gulf Coast region from multiple points of view.  To that end, the Houston Oral History Project in the Center for Public History trains history graduate students to research and interview Houstonians with recollections of the city’s civil rights, women’s, cultural, political, or medical past.  In furtherance of the mission, the UH Oral History Project entered into a collaboration with the City of Houston that will bring to the UH repository interviews of one hundred of Houston’s leaders from all walks of life.  Another large collection headed for the repository is the Offshore Energy Oral History Project, a collaboration among several UH professors and other universities to document  the growth of the oil refining industry along the Gulf Coast before and after World War II.  Topics available include interviews with Katrina emergency responders in Houston, a series of interviews with African American (black) generals, interviews with members of Houston's Indo-Asian population, and interviews from the Afro-American Physicians project, as well as a number of other topics.

Related Materials:

Oral Histories from the Houston History Project digital collection (http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory)

Biographical Note

Joseph Pratt, Ph.D., in the UH Center for Public History, established the Houston History Project to expand and improve the research done on Houston and to serve as a learning laboratory for public history students.  Professor Pratt recognized the appropriateness of a publication supported by both  a research component and a repository for archival collections and oral histories to accomplish these goals.  All three elements – Houston History magazine, the UH Oral History Program, and the Houston History Archives -- reinforce one another and add to our understanding of Houston’s history by recording, reporting, and preserving the narrative of Houston’s past.  Together, the Houston History Project’s three components contribute to the University of Houston’s mission and realize the university’s strategic initiatives.

Subject/Index Terms

African-American studies
Arts
Business
Culture
Disaster response and recovery
Emigration and immigration
Energy development
Environmental issues
Medicine
Mexican Americans - Study and teaching
Native American studies
Religion
Sports
Women’s history

Administrative Information

Repository: University of Houston Libraries

Access Restrictions: Open for research.

Use Restrictions:

Special Collections owns the physical items in our collections, but copyright normally belongs to the creator of the materials or their heirs. The researcher has full responsibility for determining copyright status, locating copyright holders, and abiding by current copyright laws when publishing or displaying copies of Special Collections material in print or electric form. For more information, consult the appropriate librarian.

Photocopy decisions will be made by Special Collection staff on a case-by-case basis. Patrons are responsible for obtaining permission to publish from copyrights holders.

Related Materials: Oral Histories from the Houston History Project digital collection For more information please see http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory.

Preferred Citation: Oral Histories-Houston History Project. Courtesy of Special Collection, University of Houston Libraries.


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: African American Studies],
[Series 2: Arts],
[Series 3: Business],
[Series 4: Culture],
[Series 5: Disaster Response and Recovery],
[Series 6: Education],
[Series 7: Energy Development],
[Series 8: Environmental Issues],
[Series 9: Galveston (Tex.) History],
[Series 10: Houston (Tex.) History],
[Series 11: Immigration],
[Series 12: Law],
[Series 13: Medicine],
[Series 14: Mexican American Studies],
[Series 15: Native American Studies],
[Series 16: Philanthropy],
[Series 17: Politics],
[Series 18: Religion],
[Series 19: LGBTQ People],
[Series 20: Sports],
[Series 21: University Of Houston],
[Series 22: Women's History],
[All]

Series 4: Culture
Box 12
Item 709: 00709_Johnson, Les "Pe Te"_Cajun Migration [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Born in Grand Taso, near Eunice, Louisiana. Served in the U.S. Air Force during Korean War and was stationed in Chateauroux, France, for two and a half years. He was a French interpreter when they opened a new base there in Chateauroux in ’53. After his service, he moved to Beaumont in 1959 and worked at Wyatt’s Cafeteria. He was transferred to Houston in 1961 and later went to work for Brown n Root building the Arco Petro Chemical Plant where he got his start in selling BBQ dinners.

He started with a few sandwiches for his co-workers. Before long, more and more people working at the plant were asking for his sandwiches. In the late 1970s, he opened his own BBQ restaurant and Cajun music dance hall in Friendswood, called Pe Te’s. In 1981, he was offered an opportunity to start a local Cajun music radio show. The follow year, he accepted a volunteer spot on KPFT’s (90.1 FM) Saturday morning line-up called Pe Te’s Cajun Bandstand, a local radio show which he has hosted for over 25 years.

He has been arguably one of the most influential public figures in promoting Cajun and Zydeco music and culture in the Houston region.

Item 711: 00711_Cook, Alison_Food: A taste of Houston/Culinary Crossroads [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Alison Cook is the restaurant critic for the Houston Chronicle. She has been an active member of Houston’s journalism and culinary world since the 1970s. Although not raised in Houston, she is deeply passionate about the city’s culinary tradition and continuous transformation. In this interview, Cook discusses the ever changing field of restaurant criticism and the trends she has seen in Houston. Cook also outlines the history of women chefs in Houston, from the 1960s, when Cook was a college student at Rice, up until today and the groundbreaking working of Monica Pope and her eat local movement.

Alison Cook was interviewed on October 23, 2010 at the M.D. Anderson Library, 114 University Libraries, Houston, TX 77204. The interview was conducted by Amy Breimaier on behalf of the Oral History Project, Center for Public History, University of Houston. The interview is available at M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.

Item 712: 00712_Galvan, Irma Gonzalez_Food: A taste of Houston/Culinary Crossroads [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Ms. Irma Gonzalez Galvan was born Brownsville, Texas in 1941 and moved with her family to Houston’s 2nd Ward when she was a young child. Here, she learned to cook from a neighbor and began preparing meals for her brothers and sisters. Later, she worked in her school’s cafeteria, as well as in a couple of neighborhood bakeries, including La Zebra and Nopal. These early experiences with food combined with retail experience, formed the foundation of Irma’s restaurant which she opened in 1989, seven years after her husband, Louis, was killed. In 2007, State Farm recognized Ms. Galvan’s perseverance and success when they awarded her the Embrace Life Award. Further recognition came the next year when Irma’s was named one the five “America’s Classics” by the James Beard Foundation.

She was interviewed on 8 October 2010 at Irma’s, 22N.Chenevert St., Houston, TX 77002. The interview was conducted by Sandra Davidson on behalf of the Oral History of Houston Project, Center for Public History, University of Houston. The interview is available at M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.

Item 713: 00713_Gutierrez, Nicholas_Food: A taste of Houston/Culinary Crossroads [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Nicholas Gutierrez, son of Buddy Guindon (commercial fisherman and owner of Katie’s Seafood Market on 1902 Wharf Road, Galveston) has managed Katie’s Seafood Market since 2007. Mr. Gutierrez grew up on Galveston and in the Texas Gulf Coast culture, working in his father’s seafood market since he was fourteen years old. In his interview, Nicholas Gutierrez discusses his role as manager at a seafood market, the types of seafood markets in the area, conflicts with the Texas Gulf Coast seafood industry, the advantages and disadvantages of working in a family run business, gender roles in the seafood industry, and the effects of Hurricane Ike and the BP oil spill.

He was interviewed on October 16, 2010 at Lasso-a-Latte, 500 Seawall Boulevard, Galveston, TX, 77550.  The interview was conducted by Jennifer Yucra on behalf of the Oral History of Houston Project, Center for Public History, University of Houston.  The interview is available at M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.

Item 714: 00714_Jaisinghani, Anita_Food: A taste of Houston/Culinary Crossroads [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Anita Jaisinghani is chef and owner of Indika restaurant, located at 516 Westheimer in Houston, Texas.

Anita Jaisinghani was interviewed on 17 November 2010.  The interview was conducted by James Wall on behalf of the Oral History of Houston Project, Center for Public History, University of Houston.  The interview is available at M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.

Item 715: 00715_Kyriazis, Eleni_Food: A taste of Houston/Culinary Crossroads [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Eleni Kyriazis is a member of the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church in Houston, Texas. She has been the pastry chairwoman for the church’s Greek Festival for twenty-two years, and was the co-chairwoman of the Festival in 2002. I consider her a leader in Houston world of Greek pastries because of her long-standing and successful leadership position at the Festival. The production of Greek pastries and Eleni’s role as chairwoman of pastries is a great place from which historians can analyze women’s role in food in Houston. The recording of the interview runs just over forty minutes.

Eleni Kyriazis was interviewed on October 4, 2010 at Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, 3511 Yoakum Boulevard, Houston, TX 77006. The interview was conducted Kristi Roberts on behalf of the Oral History of Houston Project, Center for Public History, University of Houston.  The interview is available at M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.

Item 716: 00716_Nix, Danton_Food: A taste of Houston/Culinary Crossroads [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Danton Nix was interviewed on September 30, 2010, at Danton’s Gulf Coast Seafood Kitchen, 4611 Montrose Blvd., Houston, TX 77006.  The interview was conducted by Kyle Goyette on behalf of the Oral History of Houston Project, Center for Public History, University of Houston.  The interview is available at M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.  The interview explores such issues as how Mr. Nix came to open his restaurant in Houston, his past career as a chef, what kind of relationship he has with the city and its tourism board, and how recent events such as the BP Gulf Oil Spill have affected him and his day-to-day business.  Many Houston-area businesses experienced a downturn following the media coverage of the spill, which caused many consumers to be reluctant to eat seafood that might possibly be contaminated or unhealthy.  Mr. Nix explores how such thinking affects his role as a business owner and chef.
Item 717: 00717_Pope, Monica_Food: A taste of Houston/Culinary Crossroads [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Monica Pope was interviewed to gain knowledge of the farmers markets of Houston. She talked about her involvement with the Midtown Farmers Market and food sustainability. Issues facing participants and restaurateurs are discussed. She also raises her own concerns with the future of community and food. This interview supplements another interview with Monica Pope conducted on November 4, 2010, by Amy Breimaier.

She was interviewed on November 2, 2010 at T’afia, 3701 Travis Street, Houston, TX 77002. The interview was conducted by Matthew Campbell on behalf of the Oral History of Houston Project, Center for Public History, University of Houston. The interview is available at the M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.

Item 718: 00718_Pradia, Cheryl_Food: A taste of Houston/Culinary Crossroads [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

This interview is with raw food proponent and former owner of the Raw Truth Vegetarian Café, Cheryl M. Pradia. The interview explores Ms. Pradia’s introduction to the raw food movement, her tenure as owner of the Raw Truth Café and her perception of the significance of raw foods.

She was interviewed on November 5, 2010.  The interview was conducted by Ezell Wilson on behalf of the Oral History of Houston Project, Center for Public History, University of Houston.  The interview is available at M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.

Item 719: 00719_Schechter, Lindsey_Food: A taste of Houston/Culinary Crossroads [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Lindsey Schecter is the owner operator of Houston Dairymaids, an artisan cheese wholesaler/retailer. The Dairymaids focus on providing an outlet for local artisan cheeses. Ms. Schechter works in collaboration with small goat and cow’s milk cheese producers in Texas, marketing the farmers’ products to upscale restaurants and the general public. The interview discusses not only the formation of Houston Dairymaids, but also the problems faced by raw milk cheese producers and the future of both Ms. Schechter’s business and the Texas cheese industry as a whole.

Lindsey Schechter was interviewed on 11 November 2010 at the office of Houston Dairymaids 2201 Airline Dr. Houston, Texas.  The interview was conducted by Timothy Wyatt on behalf of the Oral History of Houston Project, Center for Public History, University of Houston.  The interview is available at M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.

Item 720: 00720_Walker, Pamela_Food: A taste of Houston/Culinary Crossroads [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Pamela Walker is an educator, author, activist, and one of the founders of Houston’s Bayou City Farmers’ Market. Pamela Walker was interviewed on September 30, 2010.  The interview was conducted by Andrew Reiser on behalf of the Oral History of Houston Project, Center for Public History, University of Houston.  The interview is available at M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.
Box 13
Item 721: 00721_Caraway, Nellie M_Food: Project Row House [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Ms. Nellie Caraway was born in Beaumont, Texas but has been a long-time resident of Houston. In this interview, she stresses the importance of preparation during the cooking process, as well as the comparison of things made from scratch versus things made from a package. In particular, she highlights banana pudding as a favorite dish.

She was interviewed on 30 April 2011 at the home of Ms. Marva Smith. Her voice is not so loud due to recent health issues, but the interview is clear. The interview was conducted by Sandra Davidson and Toni Tipton- Martin. The interview is available at M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.

Item 722: 00722_Granger, Shirley L_Food: Project Row House [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Ms. Shirley Granger was born in Hungerford, Texas in the 1930s. She and her siblings grew up in a strongly religious household where family values shaped her many experiences with cooking and family interaction. As a child, she and her sister Marva lived for two years with an aunt in Los Angeles. Upon their return to Wharton County, the girls had to readjust to Texas schooling which did not offer as many opportunities as the school they attended in Los Angeles. Ms. Granger, always interested in art, pursued her education first at Wharton Junior College, then later at Texas Southern University. Her first teaching job was in Port Arthur, Texas where she lived for twelve years. She later moved to Houston where she was taught at Fonwood Elementary School for a substantial amount of time. Throughout Ms. Granger’s life cooking played an integral part. In this interview, she discusses some of her favorite dishes including jelly cakes, tea cakes and sweet potato pies.
Item 723: 00723_Lawrence, Cherry_Food: Project Row House [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Ms. Cherry Lawrence was born in Morbihan, Louisiana into a large family. She and her siblings were raised on a farm where they learned much about cooking. Favorite dishes included mustard greens and okra dishes, biscuits, gumbo, and sweet potato pie. As she grew older, Ms. Lawrence carried with her this love of cooking. She and her husband owned and operated Hungry Po’ Boy in Houston for six years. After her husband’s death, Ms. Lawrence worked at the Medical Center del Oro as assistant to the Food Service Director. Today, she continues to cook for the seniors every week at Lilly Grove Missionary Baptist Church.

She was interviewed on 30 April 2011 at the home of Ms. Marva Smith. The interview was conducted by Sandra Davidson and Toni Tipton-Martin. The last part of the interview is missing due to operator error. The interview is available at M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.

Item 724: 00724_Mayes, Mary Winston_Food: Project Row House [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Ms. Mary Winston Mayes was born in Clayton, Mississippi. She recounts favorite cooking and baking experiences with gher grandmother, Ms. Essie Guy. In particular, Ms. Mayes discusses making butter rolls, Biscuits, molasses bread and sweet potato pies during a time when people used ice boxes to cool their foods.

She was interviewed on 30 April 2011 in the home of Ms. Marva Smith. The interview was conducted by Sandra Davidson. The interview is available at M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.

Item 725: 00725_Smith, Marva_Food: Project Row House [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Ms. Marva Hicks Smith was born in Hungerford, Texas in 1930s. She and her sister, Shirley, attended the Wharton County schools until they went to Los Angeles, California to stay with an aunt for two years. Schools in Los Angeles offered more opportunities during those years and when the girls returned to Texas, they had to make some adjustments. Ms. Smith graduated from Powell Point High School in Fort Bend County, then went on to nursing school. She worked in Houston’s Medical Center at St. Luke’s Hospital. Throughout her life, she has carried with her a love of cooking. She recounts favorite dishes including biscuits, jelly cake, tea cakes, cobblers, turkey and greens.

She was interviewed on 30 April 2011 in her home. The interview was conducted by Sandra Davidson and Toni Tipton-Martin. The interview is available at M.D. Anderson Library on the main campus of the university.

Item 726: 00726_Weinberg, Marvin_Food: Houston Farmer's Market [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Many of the farmers who came into Houston to sell their produce were members of a community of farmers of German descent who lived and worked in farms located in northwest section of Harris County. They traveled to Houston on the weekends to market, which at the time was located in the northwest quadrant of the downtown area. Mr. Weinberg lived during much of that era and at the time of the interview was still part of the Farmer’s Market that had moved several years ago to its present location on Airline Drive.
Box 14
Item 768: 00768_Look, Carole_Food: Houston's RestaurantsView associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Debbie Harwell

Project: University of Houston

Item 770: 00770_Kesbeh, Wesal_Food: Gulf Coast FoodwaysView associated digital content.

Interviewer(s):  Aimee L'Heureux

Project: University of Houston

Wesal Kesbeh was born in Kuwait to Palestinian parents from the West Bank. The family moved to Jordan when she was twelve years old and she lived there until age eighteen when she got married through an arranged marriage, or as she calls it “a living room wedding,” and immigrated to the United States. Wesal discusses her foray into cooking when her mother had to work upon her father’s death. She talks about memories of cooking as a family in the summer when all the relatives who lived in the Gulf came to visit Jordan.

Wesal feels strongly about teaching her children how to cook Palestinian food because it is part of their identity and one thing that was not taken from them. She talked extensively about Arab hospitality and food. She believes that there is no way you can be Arab and be thin. Wesal also explained the contention about the falafel’s origins and discussed the one dish that men make when it comes to Palestinian food: hash-nash, or Arabic barbeque.

Item 771: 00771_Reed, Lakesha_Food: Gulf Coast FoodwaysView associated digital content.

Interviewer(s):  Aimee L'Heureux

Project: University of Houston

Item 772: 00772_Zabak, Brigitte_Food: Gulf Coast FoodwaysView associated digital content.

Interviewer(s):  Aimee L'Heureux

Project: University of Houston

Brigitte Zabak is a native Houstonian whose parents came to the United States from Ramallah, Palestine. She discusses her family restaurants in Tennessee and in Houston. The Houston Press recognized Zabak’s, Brigitte’s cousins’ restaurant on Westheimer and Hillcroft, for having the best falafel in the city. Their falafel recipe was handed down from her Aunt and Uncle, or as Houstonians know them, Kay and George. Kay (Karima) and George owned Mama’s Po’Boys.

Brigitte discusses growing up with Israeli friends and feeling disconnected to Muslim Palestinians because her family was Christian. She discusses her mother’s death from cancer and how that led her to start re-creating her mother’s recipes, which simultaneously got her writing again. She began the blog, Zayt and Zaatar, to document that experience. Brigitte describes the family pressure to be thin, beautiful, and marry early, while constantly serving delicious Palestinian food. Unable to reconcile the two, Brigitte became bulimic.

Item 811: 00811_Northup, Temple_Food[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Ismelda R. Correa

Project: University Of Houston

Dr. Temple Northup is co-director of the Gulf Coast Food Project, which is based at the University of Houston Center for Public History. The Gulf Coast Food project is focused on food research in the Gulf Coast region. Northup elaborates on one of the branches within the project, Houston Eats. Elements of the local food movement were discussed in depth. They include farmers markets, sustainability, and key players in Houston that have influenced the movement. He described the local movement, unintentionally, has an elitist connotation, which lead the project to shift its focus towards food access issues within the Loop. From his experience, Dr. Northup points out how the local food movement is vastly different within the U.S. and how it differs from where the movement originated, Berkeley, California.

Item 819: 00819_Vallone, Tony_Food[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Lulin Wang

Project: University Of Houston

For Tony Vallone, fine dinning is not defined by the price of the meal or how fancy the dining room's décor is, but rather by the attention to detail, from the selection of ingredients to the way the food is presented to the customers—just the way they like it. One of the most influential restaurateurs in Houston, he opened Tony‟s in 1965, originally where the Galleria stands today. It introduced authentic Italian food to the city of Houston, eventually becoming the longest-lived fine dining establishment in Houston. Over the years, it has served seven presidents, numerous dignitaries, and countless celebrities. Vallone traces his personal history in the business and discusses the past and the present trends of the Houston restaurant scene and the restaurant industry in general. He talks in detail about what constitutes fine dining and how trends in foods and wines have changed over the last fifty years to appeal to the changing and sophisticated palates of Houstonians.

Item 826: 00826_Emmett, Ed_Preservation[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Ernesto Valdés

Project: University Of Houston

Judge Ed Emmett discusses his memories of visiting Westbury Square in the 1960s. At the time, Emmett was a student at Rice University and enjoyed going to the shopping center for entertainment. He discusses the various shops and restaurants that were there along with the architecture and possible revitalization of the center. Emmett also talks about other popular areas for college students and young adults in Houston in the 1960s and 1970s.

Item 827: 00827_Emmett, Gwen_Preservation[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Ernesto Valdés

Project: University Of Houston

Gwen Emmett recounts Westbury Square in its infancy during the 1960s. Westbury Square provided a recreational destination for teenaged youths, and Gwen compares the close-knit, formal social lives of young adults in the sixties to the more independent and accessible ones of millennials. Gwen remembers how the concept of a specialty store seemed foreign to her and how she transitioned from home-sewn clothing to store-bought clothing in her college years. Gwen revisits then-popular Houston shops and business like Sakowitz, Foley’s, and Compton’s as well as discusses newer sites such as Home Depot and the surrounding community’s reaction to replacements. Gwen supports the preservation of Westbury Square and discusses with Ernesto plans to regain interest in the area through attractions such as art galleries and stresses the importance of maintaining authenticity in tourist attractions. In addition to Westbury Square, Gwen provides her thoughts on multilingualism, the “American melting pot” metaphor, and the attitudes towards different cultures in the United States.


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: African American Studies],
[Series 2: Arts],
[Series 3: Business],
[Series 4: Culture],
[Series 5: Disaster Response and Recovery],
[Series 6: Education],
[Series 7: Energy Development],
[Series 8: Environmental Issues],
[Series 9: Galveston (Tex.) History],
[Series 10: Houston (Tex.) History],
[Series 11: Immigration],
[Series 12: Law],
[Series 13: Medicine],
[Series 14: Mexican American Studies],
[Series 15: Native American Studies],
[Series 16: Philanthropy],
[Series 17: Politics],
[Series 18: Religion],
[Series 19: LGBTQ People],
[Series 20: Sports],
[Series 21: University Of Houston],
[Series 22: Women's History],
[All]

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