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Oral Histories - Houston History Project

Overview

Scope and Contents

Biographical Note

Administrative Information

Finding Aid/Inventory

African American Studies

Arts

Business

Culture

Disaster Response and Recovery

Education

Energy Development

Environmental Issues

Galveston (Tex.) History

Houston (Tex.) History

Immigration

Law

Medicine

Mexican American Studies

Native American Studies

Philanthropy

Politics

Religion

Sexual Minorities

Sports

University Of Houston

Women's History



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Oral Histories - Houston History Project, 1996- | University of Houston Libraries

By Reddy Guntaka, Tanmay Wagh, Madhuri Keshavarao, Tai Luong

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Collection Overview

Title: Oral Histories - Houston History Project, 1996-View associated digital content.

ID: 07/2006-005

Primary Creator: Houston History Project

Extent: 25.0 Linear Feet

Arrangement:

Oral histories are arranged numerically. Identifers include the Houston History Archives (HHA) number, interviewee's name, and subject module. Interviews consist of typewritten transcripts and audio interviews, presently available for reading and listening in the Special Collections Department of M.D. Anderson Library.

All formats for an interview are shelved by number in appropriate storage boxes.  Transcripts (typed pages) are housed in record cartons, audiotapes and CDs are housed in specialty boxes.  Each format includes sequential numbers appropirate  boxes. Because boxes and formats are configured differently, Box 1 in one format does not hold the same set of interview numbers as Box 1 in another format. However, searching for a specific interview number across formats will  produce all available interivew materials for that interviewee.

Date Acquired: 00/00/2005

Subjects: African-American studies, Arts, Business, Culture, Disaster response and recovery, Emigration and immigration, Energy development, Environmental issues, Medicine, Mexican Americans - Study and teaching, Native American studies, Religion, Sports, Women’s history

Forms of Material: Audiocassettes, Compact discs, Interviews, Sound recordings, Transcripts

Languages: English

Scope and Contents of the Materials

When UH’s Center for Public History and the University Libraries collaborated to create the Houston History Archives (UH-HHA), part of their mission included a repository for oral histories that tell stories of the growth and development of the Gulf Coast region from multiple points of view.  To that end, the Houston Oral History Project in the Center for Public History trains history graduate students to research and interview Houstonians with recollections of the city’s civil rights, women’s, cultural, political, or medical past.  In furtherance of the mission, the UH Oral History Project entered into a collaboration with the City of Houston that will bring to the UH repository interviews of one hundred of Houston’s leaders from all walks of life.  Another large collection headed for the repository is the Offshore Energy Oral History Project, a collaboration among several UH professors and other universities to document  the growth of the oil refining industry along the Gulf Coast before and after World War II.  Topics available include interviews with Katrina emergency responders in Houston, a series of interviews with African American (black) generals, interviews with members of Houston's Indo-Asian population, and interviews from the Afro-American Physicians project, as well as a number of other topics.

Related Materials:

Oral Histories from the Houston History Project digital collection (http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory)

Biographical Note

Joseph Pratt, Ph.D., in the UH Center for Public History, established the Houston History Project to expand and improve the research done on Houston and to serve as a learning laboratory for public history students.  Professor Pratt recognized the appropriateness of a publication supported by both  a research component and a repository for archival collections and oral histories to accomplish these goals.  All three elements – Houston History magazine, the UH Oral History Program, and the Houston History Archives -- reinforce one another and add to our understanding of Houston’s history by recording, reporting, and preserving the narrative of Houston’s past.  Together, the Houston History Project’s three components contribute to the University of Houston’s mission and realize the university’s strategic initiatives.

Subject/Index Terms

African-American studies
Arts
Business
Culture
Disaster response and recovery
Emigration and immigration
Energy development
Environmental issues
Medicine
Mexican Americans - Study and teaching
Native American studies
Religion
Sports
Women’s history

Administrative Information

Repository: University of Houston Libraries

Access Restrictions: Open for research.

Use Restrictions:

Special Collections owns the physical items in our collections, but copyright normally belongs to the creator of the materials or their heirs. The researcher has full responsibility for determining copyright status, locating copyright holders, and abiding by current copyright laws when publishing or displaying copies of Special Collections material in print or electric form. For more information, consult the appropriate librarian.

Photocopy decisions will be made by Special Collection staff on a case-by-case basis. Patrons are responsible for obtaining permission to publish from copyrights holders.

Related Materials: Oral Histories from the Houston History Project digital collection For more information please see http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/houhistory.

Preferred Citation: Oral Histories-Houston History Project. Courtesy of Special Collection, University of Houston Libraries.


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: African American Studies],
[Series 2: Arts],
[Series 3: Business],
[Series 4: Culture],
[Series 5: Disaster Response and Recovery],
[Series 6: Education],
[Series 7: Energy Development],
[Series 8: Environmental Issues],
[Series 9: Galveston (Tex.) History],
[Series 10: Houston (Tex.) History],
[Series 11: Immigration],
[Series 12: Law],
[Series 13: Medicine],
[Series 14: Mexican American Studies],
[Series 15: Native American Studies],
[Series 16: Philanthropy],
[Series 17: Politics],
[Series 18: Religion],
[Series 19: Sexual Minorities],
[Series 20: Sports],
[Series 21: University Of Houston],
[Series 22: Women's History],
[All]

Series 11: Immigration
Box 9
Item 548: 00548_Blum, Ann_Holocaust (2004) [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Sheena, Shannon

Project: University of Houston

Item 549: 00549_Blum, Morris_Holocaust (2004) [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Sheena, Shannon

Project: University of Houston

Item 554: 00554_Joskowitz, Aaron_Holocaust (2004) [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Arthur Pronin

Project: University of Houston

Aaron Joskowitz is twenty-five years of age. He is the grandson of two Holocaust survivors. His grandmother, Louise Stopnicki [maiden name], grew up in  Krakow. She survived many camps, including Auschwitz. Aaron's grandfather, Rubin Joskowitz, was raised in Sosnowiec Poland. He was sent immediately to concentration camps in 1939 after Hitler invaded his country. Fifty family members were killed during the holocaust. Louise and Rubin met immediately after the war and were married. Aaron's mother. Pepi Nichols, was born in Landsburg Germany on March 3, 1949. She is very active among second generation Holocaust survivors in the Houston region. Aaron resides in Houston Texas. His brother Joshua Brownstein, mother and grandparents also live in the same city. He is currently involved in trying to make a name for himself in the music recording business.

Item 561: 00561_Nichols, Pepi_Holocaust (2004) [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer(s): Arthur Pronin

Project: University of Houston

Item 567: 00567_Abdullah, Zaffar_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 568: 00568_Bala, Prabha_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 569: 00569_Bhatia, Champa_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 570: 00570_Bombaywala, Ghulam_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 571: 00571_Fatima, Nargis_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 572: 00572_Kamdar, Jagat_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 573: 00573_Kazi, Alia Hayat_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 574: 00574_Kazi, Mazhar_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 575: 00575_Khan, M.J._Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 576: 00576_Khumawala, Salehe_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 577: 00577_Kumar, Anil_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 578: 00578_Kumar, Rathna_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 579: 00579_Siddiqui, Imrose_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 580: 00580_Siddiqui, Mohammed_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 581: 00581_Vavilala, Krishna S._Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 582: 00582_Wong, Martha_Indo-Asian [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Box 13
Item 731: 00731_Ajgaonkar, Praful and Vijaya_Immigration-India [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

This interview includes several exchanges in Urdu/Hindi since Mrs. Ajgaonkar’s first language is Marathi. All such passages have been translated into English.

The Ajgaonkars are from Mumbai, India. Praful came to Lubbock, Texas in 1964 to complete his BS in chemical engineering from Texas A &M University. He recalls ROTC being a central feature of the university as well as it being an all-male campus. He spent a short time in Houston in 1966, moved to Dallas for two years until 1969, returned to Houston for two years, and then lived in India for 6 months. He had married Vijaya in 1967, permanently settling in Houston in 1973. For a short time, the family lived in southwest Houston at Bellaire and Hillcroft before moving to Alief. There, they raised a son and a daughter. They comment on the changing demographics of the Alief area, public schools and immigration.

Item 732: 00732_Anand, Pradeep_Immigration-India [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Pradeep Anand came to Houston from Bombay in 1978. Born in 1950, his grandparents and ancestors were originally from Tamil Nadu. He attended a private Catholic school in his youth and trained as an engineer at Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay (IIT). Like his relative, Mr. Anand sought a scholarship for an advanced degree overseas and because his sister had moved to Houston, he applied to the University of Houston. He worked toward a PhD in business marketing but ultimately decided to graduate with a MBA in 1981. On campus, Mr. Anand was president of the Indian Students Association and was actively involved in Indian campus activities. After struggling through Houston’s economic recession in the early to mid-eighties, he founded Seeta Resources, a marketing strategy firm, in 1994. In 2006, Mr. Anand published a semi-autobiographical book, An Indian in Cowboy Country.
Item 733: 00733_Bansal, Virinder_Immigration-India [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Hailing from Punjab, Virinder Bansal came to New York in 1970. An engineer by training, Mr. Bansal moved to Channel view, Texas in 1975 to work as a supervisor on an oil rig. He worked for Lummus Company and worked briefly in Iraq in 1978, after which he found a job in Houston-based Kellogg Company. He lives with his wife as well as his adult son, daughter-in-law, and two grandchildren in an expanded house in southwest-central Houston. His son specifically sought an orphaned woman to marry and has been married for seven years.
Item 734: 00734_Bhuchar, Vijay_Immigration-India [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Vijay Bhuchar moved to Houston from New Orleans and Delhi in 1975. She enjoyed a multi-sites childhood since her father worked as an accountant for UN-WHO. After studying English at Delhi University, Bhuchar married a doctor-in-training and eventually settled in Houston’s suburbs. She worked as a homemaker and has devoted much time to charity work. She has two daughters and one son.
Item 735: 00735_Desai, Pankaj_Immigration-India [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Pankaj Desai enjoyed an affluent childhood in Bombay where his parents had migrated in the 1930s. Originally, his ancestors were from Kindergarten through grade 12, Mr. Desai attended St. Joseph’s, a private Catholic boy’s school. In 1974 Mr. Desai arrived in Houston from Bombay as a graduate student in chemical engineering at the University of Houston. He completed his PhD in 1979. In 1980, he married a professional Indian women already settled in Chicago. He and his wife have one child, a daughter who attended private and suburban schools. As a side interest, Mr. Desai enjoys competitive running in half-marathons.
Item 736: 00736_Kavadi, Sharad and Vasudha [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Raised in Puna and Bombay, Sharad and Vasudha Kavadi have lived in Houston since 1980. Sharad Kavadi worked for several years as an architect before retiring. His wife, Vasudha, is a homemaker. Between 1968 and 1980, they moved to New York, Kentucky, and San Francisco while working for the same engineering company, Bechtel. They lived in Houston for a few months in 1976 but did not like the city. They found that a major shift in attitudes toward foreigners has occurred by 1980, largely due to the influx of foreigners and large professional companies. Their son and daughter attended Rice University for their undergraduate education- education being a high priority within the Kavadi family. Mr. Kavadi speaks of the instances of impoliteness he has experienced as a foreigner though both husbands and wife are quick to point to a generally welcoming attitude among Houstonians.
Item 737: 00737_Khan, Mazahir_Immigration-India [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Born in Rampur, India, Mazahir Khan migrated to Karachi, Pakistan in 1955 where he attended the University of Karachi. In 1966, he came to the US on a Fulbright Scholarship and attended Texas Tech University for his doctoral degree in Physics. While in Lubbock, he met his future wife, a Euro-American named Bonnie. He graduated in 1973 and found his job in Houston. Later, Mr. Khan worked for Mobil. He has three sons. For most of his life, he has invested much energy in his career and in establishing the central mosque of Houston, ISGH. He previously served as Director of the full-time Islamic School at the Synott Mosque.
Item 738: 00738_Kothari, Vimal_Immigration-India [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Vimal Kothari arrived in Houston from Bombay in 1979 to work on an MS in electrical engineering at the University of Houston, which he completed in 1981. In 1988 he founded Sytel, Inc., a now mid-sized company that builds industrial computers for sale in the US and Canada. His three children attended private schools in Houston and the family has lived in the suburbs for several years. In the interview, Mr. Kothari recollects childhood interactions between his family and Britishers in India, changing rates of safety in the city of Houston, spirituality, and discrimination.
Item 739: 00739_Mahagaonkar, Uday_Immigration-India [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Uday Mahagaokar was born in Kanpur, India. He attended IIT Kanpur and majored in chemical engineering. He then received a scholarship for graduate studies at the University of Houston and graduated with a PhD in 1976. He lived for a short time in Chicago before returning to Houston and joining Shell Oil Company where he worked for 31 years. His wife holds a PhD in the biomedical sciences.
Item 740: 00740_Manekshaw, Sarosh_Immigration-India [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Sarosh Manekshaw was born in UP, India but attended a boarding school in Dehra Dun until high school graduation. He completed his BS at IIT – Kharagpur after which he earned an S in chemical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh. He worked at Pennzoil Company from 1976 to 1999 by which point he was the Corporate Director of Environmental Safety and Health for Pennzoil. After taking an early retirement, Mr. Manekshaw established his own small consulting firm, commuting between Mumbai and Houston. He is married and has one son.
Item 741: 00741_Mehta, Pradip_Immigration-India [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Pradip Mehta grew up in Bombay, India and majored in Chemical engineering at IIT Knapur. He went on to complete a PhD at the University of Houston in 1978. He has worked for a company called Celanese Chemicals in Corpus Christi, Texas for over twenty years and moved to Houston and they have two children, a son and a daughter.
Item 742: 00742_Rajguru_Uma_Immigration-India [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Uma Rajguru is a retired medical technologist. She was born in Poona and raised in Bombay where she completed her BS. She earned her MS at UC Berkeley in 1965, returned to India and worked. After marriage, she and her husband, Anil, moved to Delhi and London, before settling in Houston in 1974. She has two sons, worked for over thirty years, and has lived in the greater Houston area since arrival. Her older son married a Mexican American woman. In the interview, Ms. Rajguru speaks in detail about her childhood in Poona, arranged marriage in India, the various regions of India and her social interactions in Houston.
Box 14
Item 774: 00774_Kurd (El), Dana_Palestinians

Interviewer(s):  Aimee L'Heureux

Project: University of Houston

Item 789: 00789_Abu-Rish,Wagih_ Palestinians[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Aimee Bachari

Project: University of Houston

Wagih Abu-Rish was born in Al-Eizariyah, or Bethany, Palestine in 1942. He left with his siblings in 1947 as the Arab-Israeli War intensified, first staying with family in Egypt and later joining his father in Lebanon where he finished high school. Abu-Rish came to the United States in 1961 to attend the University of Houston on a scholarship through an oil company. He graduated in 1966. During his time at the University of Houston he served in the Organization of Arab Students (OAS) and as president of the International Student Organization. Later, he served as vice president of the national OAS. Abu-Rish continues to work on Arab American causes, mainly civil rights, human rights, immigration, and public policy.

Item 790: 00790_Abusharekh,khalil_Palestinians[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Khalil Abusharekh

Project: University of Houston

Born in a refugee camp, Khalil Abusharekh spent over twenty years living in Gaza City. In this interview he begins by describing day to day life in Palestine, from punishments by Israeli soldiers to frequent curfews bestowed upon neighborhoods. After completing a degree in graphic design Khalil made a decision to seek work outside Gaza and found himself in the United Arab Emirates. In his travels, Khalil experienced prejudices faced by everyday Gazans in foreign Arab countries and calls passing through Jordan a “horrible experience.” Eventually Khalil obtained a student visa and settled in Houston, Texas and began to study film making at Houston Community College. Khalil is a self-proclaimed political activist and aims to shine a light on the conflicts in the Middle East through his work. He elaborates on two of his projects, both of them political; one tackling anti-Iraqi war sentiments and the other exploring the FOB “Fresh Off the Boat” concept usually associated with immigrants. Khalil also discusses his work with local cultural events such as the Palestinian Cultural Festival and gives his thought on the authenticity of the events and the modernization and proliferation of Middle Eastern culture as well as modern-day journalism and the impacts social media has had in the Middle East.

Item 792: 00792_Andrews, Richard_Asian American[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Thu Huong Vu

Project: University of Houston

Dr. Richard Andrews spoke about his background and experience with public health and how he became involved with the HOPE Clinic. He recounted his early days working at the HOPE Clinic, describing the clinic’s status at the time and the problems that he personally encountered at the clinic as a physician. Dr. Andrews also briefly discussed his current work and the clinic’s current needs and future plan. Dr. Beverly Gor spoke about the founding of and her involvement with the Asian American Health Coalition and the HOPE Clinic. She talked about the early days of the clinic and the clinic’s growth and achievements over the years. Dr. Gor gave details pertaining to the clinic’s role during and after Hurricane Katrina. She also talked about ongoing projects and her hope and plans for the clinic in the future.

Item 796: 00796_Calvert, Rogene Gee_Asian American[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Thu Huong Vu

Project: University Of Houston

Rogene Gee Calvert speaks about her interest in the welfare of the Asian American community in Houston and how she came to cofound the Asian American Health Coalition and later the HOPE Clinic. She recounts the early days of the HOPE Clinic, the problems that they encountered in establishing and running the clinic, and the clinic’s growth and achievements. Dr. Andrea Caracostis discusses her involvement with the HOPE Clinic and the work she has done with the clinic thus far. She goes into detail about the growth of HOPE Clinic in terms of funding and federal designation. The two women wrap up the interview by stating their plans to expand HOPE Clinic’s capacity and services and their commitments to the clinic’s mission.

Item 804: 00804_Hansen, Walter_Holocaust[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Lindsey Martin

Project: University Houston

Walter Hansen is in charge of the restoration of the Danish Fishing Boat at Holocaust Museum Houston. Although not affiliated with the Holocaust Museum, he is a passionate volunteer who wants to tell the story of some of Denmark‟s heroes. Walter learned the craft of building wooden boats from his father-in-law. He had never heard of the museum‟s fishing boat until a few years before this interview when someone approached him about restoring it. When Walter heard the boat‟s story, he knew he wanted to help not only with the restoration process but also telling the history of the Jews who escaped to safety on fishing boats during the Holocaust. Throughout the interview, his passion for the fishing boat shines brightly. Walter goes to schools to talk about the boat as well as the history of the Danes who helped prevent some of the deportations. The boat symbolizes hope for the Danish Jews and future generations to see that good things happened amidst the horrors of the Holocaust. Walter personally watches over the renovations, which should be completed in 2015, and is quite proud of the volunteers helping to restore the boat.

Item 813: 00813_Perry, Ira_Holocaust[available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer: Victor Romero

Project: University Of Houston

Ira Perry, director of marketing and public auctions for the Holocaust Museum Houston discusses many aspects of the museum, beginning with Holocaust survivor Siegi Izakson‟s idea to create the facility. Built entirely with private funding, the museum was designed by architect Ralph Applebaum incorporated elements into the design to symbolize the tightening control over the lives of European Jews throughout the 1930s and 1940s, culminating in the deaths of over six million people. Perry talks about the permanent exhibits, which include Bearing Witness: A Community Remembers, the Eric Alexander Garden of Hope, the railcar like those used to carry Jews to the concentration camps, and a Danish boat like those used to ferry Jews from Denmark to safety in Sweden. With an emphasis on education, the museum also employs special exhibits, school tours, the trunk program, and teacher training to help for children understand the museum‟s message to never let something like the Holocaust happen again. Perry also mentions some of the survivor stories that are featured at the museum and survivors themselves who volunteer and give tours at the museum. Perry explains that by putting a human face on what happened to the Jews, it makes it more difficult to ignore the reality of what happened and hopefully encourages people to stand up against tyranny.

Box 15
Item 00841: 00841_Molinaro, Domenick [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

Interviewer : Johnny Zapata

Project : University of Houston

A student at the University of Houston interviews Domenick Molinaro on his life and Houston’s history after his arrival in 1960. Born in Germany, the interviewee describes his rough upbringing alongside the backdrop of World War II and his life in service. He then details his coming to America, his assimilation, and serving in the Army and the National Guard during the occupation of West Berlin, where he was stationed at Checkpoint Charlie. He answers questions on the development of Houston after the war, the growth of the city, its demographic and social changes, and historical occurrences. Ending, Molinaro compared the United States and Germany, and Germany’s “Americanization.”

Item 00844: 00844_Strack, Elsie [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.
Item 00846: 00846_Chew, Suzanne [available online - see Digital Library]View associated digital content.

interviewer : Jessica Chew

Project : University of Houston

Vietnam War immigrant Suzanne Chew briefly describes her passage from Vietnam to the United States, the traditions she has kept from her homeland, and America’s influence on her and her family. She starts off with her journey from Vietnam to Paris and then to the United States. Her first home in America was in California, and she describes the big Asian community in Los Angeles.Continuing, Suzanne talks about her decisions to move from California to Texas and describes the Vietnamese – Chinese cultures in Houston. For example, Milam is a good place to find nearly authentic Vietnamese foods. The interview also covers how American customs have influenced her Vietnamese – Chinese traditions. She explains that since Houston has a larger variety of food, like burgers and pizza, Chinese food is not eaten as often. She also discusses smaller cemetery ceremonies and visits and compares American wedding traditions to Chinese ones. Furthermore, Lunar New Year is more condensed in Houston than in Vietnam or China. She does say that the Chinese – Vietnamese community in Houston is expanding. In the later part of the interview, Suzanne describes her recent trip to Vietnam. She states that Vietnam has also become Americanized in the cities but not as much in the countryside.


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: African American Studies],
[Series 2: Arts],
[Series 3: Business],
[Series 4: Culture],
[Series 5: Disaster Response and Recovery],
[Series 6: Education],
[Series 7: Energy Development],
[Series 8: Environmental Issues],
[Series 9: Galveston (Tex.) History],
[Series 10: Houston (Tex.) History],
[Series 11: Immigration],
[Series 12: Law],
[Series 13: Medicine],
[Series 14: Mexican American Studies],
[Series 15: Native American Studies],
[Series 16: Philanthropy],
[Series 17: Politics],
[Series 18: Religion],
[Series 19: Sexual Minorities],
[Series 20: Sports],
[Series 21: University Of Houston],
[Series 22: Women's History],
[All]

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